Study says 1980s saw major climate shift

Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:

Golden toads were discovered in Coata Rica in 1966. None have been seen since 1989, despite intensive surveys. They are presumed extinct. PHOTO COURTESY U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE. Golden toads were discovered in Costa Rica in 1966. None have been seen since 1989, despite intensive surveys. They are presumed extinct. Photo courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

‘The 1980s regime shift may be the beginning of the acceleration of the warming shown by the IPCC …’

Staff Report

By taking a big-picture look at the Earth’s various systems over time, researchers say they’ve been able to pinpoint a major global climate shift starting in the late 1980s, triggered by anthropogenic warming and the 1982 El Chichón volcanic eruption in Mexico.

The new study, published recently in Global Change Biology, documents a range of associated events caused by the shift, including a 60 percent increase in winter river flow into the Baltic Sea and a 400 percent increase in the average duration of wildfires in the Western United States.

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More proof there is no global warming ‘pause’

Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:

sfg There is no ‘pause’ in global warming.

‘Why has so much research been framed around the concept of a ‘hiatus’ when it does not exist?’

Staff Report

After a couple of years of furor over the faux global warming pause, scientists with the University of Bristol (UK) say they have yet more evidence there was never any slowdown in the steady rise of temperatures worldwide.

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9 reasons we’re giving thanks this Thanksgiving

Originally posted on Mile High Water Talk:

Water you thankful for?

By Jimmy Luthye

With Thanksgiving upon us, we didn’t feel right stuffing our faces without first sharing some of the things that made us most thankful this year.

1. Bountiful fills and spills.


We had a lot of water this year, especially early. Three of our reservoirs set record highs in May, with a fourth recording its second highest total in history. Wetter is better.

2. Our water system looks like this.

Dillon_August_2010 005

Dillon Reservoir. ’Nuff said.

3. Turns out, it’s easy to do Thanksgiving without wasting water.

Turkey photo iStock cropped

[Photo credit:]

We’re thankful to have so many tips to enjoy the holiday while saving water. For instance, thaw your frozen turkey in the refrigerator — not under running water. Read and learn, as I have.

4. Nature.

close up

We’re thankful we live in a place where we balance human needs and those of the animal world. And…

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Here’s how the climate-denial sausage is made

Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:

dsfg There’s no question global temperatures have been climbing steadily for decades, yet a small cadre of radical organizations has been working to deceive the public about the realities of climate change.

New Yale study shows funding behind the effort to mislead Americans on climate science

By Bob Berwyn

Organizations funded by ExxonMobil and the Koch brothers form the core of a disinformation network that has spawned a vast body of literature that deliberately tries to deceive the public about global warming, according to a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

The research by Yale University researcher Dr. Justin Farrell closely scoured more than 40,000 texts produced by the climate change counter-movement (164 organizations), finding that  organizations with corporate funding were more likely to have written and disseminated texts meant to polarize the climate change issue.

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Climate: Small temperature changes have big impacts in Arctic Ocean ecosystems

Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:

sdfgA NASA Earth Observatory satellite image captures a 2010 plankton bloom off the coast of Greenland.

Long-term study tracks shifting currents in Fram Straight

Staff Report

Intensive monitoring along the Fram Straight, between Greenland Svalbard, shows that even a short-term influx of warm water into the Arctic Ocean would be likely to have long-lasting effects on regional ecosystems.

Even small changes in surface water temperatures could quickly spread to affect life in the depths of the Arctic Ocean, a team of scientists concluded in a new study published in the journal Ecological Indicators.

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NOAA reports record global warmth for October 2015

Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:

dsfg dsfg

Sea ice extent below average at both poles; northern hemisphere snow cover well above average

Staff Report

For the sixth month in a row, the global average temperature broke all historical records in October, soaring to 1.76 degrees Fahrenheit above the monthly average.

According the monthly climate report from NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center, it was by far the warmest October on record, breaking the record set just last year by 0.36 degrees Fahrenheit. It was also the largest the monthly departure from average from any month on record.

Both land- and sea-surface temperatures set records during the month, a sure sign that El Niño is fueling the spike in global temps and all but ensuring that this year will go down in the books as the warmest on record.

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Study: Doubling of CO2 may warm Earth by 3 degrees Celsius

Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:

asdf New data shows climate may be more sensitive to CO2 than previously thought.

New chemical analysis sends climate warming signal

Staff Report

A study of ancient carbonate crystals in Colorado suggests that the Earth’s climate is more sensitive to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide than believed.

Based on the chemical analysis of rocks from the Green River formation, scientists think that a doubling of CO2 from pre-industrial times could raise the global temperature by a whopping 3 degrees Celsius.

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