Climate: World’s highest mountain areas warming swiftly

April 26, 2015

Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:

North Tenmile Creek trail, Frisco Colorado Global warming will have profound impacts on mountain ecosystems, @bberwyn photo.

Scientists say there’s an urgent need for more widespread data collection and observations from high elevations

Staff Report

FRISCO — After one of the mildest winters on record in the Colorado high country, it may come as no surprise to hear that the world’s highest mountains may be warming much faster than than the global average — and faster than previously thought.

Most of all, an international team of scientists said this week that more monitoring and observations of mountain temperature patterns are needed to assess the high-elevation changes.

Absent that data, there’s a risk of underestimating  looming environmental challenges, including water shortages and the possible extinction of some alpine flora and fauna, the scientists reported in their new study.

View original 619 more words


Colorado sues feds over new fracking rules

April 26, 2015

Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:

Colorado AG claims BLM regs ‘invade’ state authority

asdfg A fracking rig in western Colorado. @bberwyn photo.

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO —Colorado Attorney General Cynthia Coffman is challenging the federal government’s ability to regulate oil and gas development on federal public lands in the state. In a quiet Friday news dump, Coffman announced her department is suing the federal government over new fracking rules issued in March.

The lawsuit claims the federal rules “invade” the state’s regulatory authority, a similar argument over jurisdiction used by Gov. Hickenlooper and his administration when they sued a local jurisdiction that sought to impose fracking rules in a case that has since been dismissed.

View original 424 more words


Morning photo: Springtime in the Rockies

April 25, 2015

Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:

Bursting forth …

FRISCO —The Colorado high country is spectacular any time of year, but spring is my favorite season. It’s the time of year when you can still ski on the mountains, often in some of the best snow of the year. But down in the valleys, Mother Nature is busy building a new season. Since the mountain growing season is so short, spring comes in a hurry. Plants don’t have the luxury of taking their time if they want to bloom and produce flowers and seeds for reproduction, so everything seems to pop all at once with a fecundity that’s as astounding as it is reassuring.

For daily photography updates, follow our Instagram feed, and visit our online gallery for an amazing selection of prints and greeting cards.

View original


Water restrictions in California could impact Denver Water customers, too

April 24, 2015

Originally posted on Mile High Water Talk:

Water restrictions in California could impact Denver Water customers, too

Colorado, California and five other western states all draw water from the Colorado River. How each state manages this resource connects all of us.

Denver Water's Cheesman Reservoir during the 2002 drought. Colorado is all too familiar with the kind of drought California is experiencing right now. Denver Water’s Cheesman Reservoir during the 2002 drought – a stark reminder that Colorado is always susceptible to the kind of drought gripping California right now.

By Steve Snyder

If you haven’t heard about the drought in California, just Google “California drought” and scroll through the images of cracked earth, snowless ski resorts and nearly empty lakes.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration called it the worst drought on record. Recently, California Gov. Jerry Brown called for mandatory water restrictions in the state.

But why should Denver Water customers care? Sure we’ve seen our share of droughts in recent years, but right now our water supply is in pretty good shape. And Denver…

View original 279 more words


Increasing consciousness: Arizona’s investment in water education

April 23, 2015

Originally posted on Your Water Colorado Blog:

CFWE's executive director, Nicole Seltzer CFWE’s executive director, Nicole Seltzer

I spend a fair amount of time in the Phoenix area visiting my sister and her family.  The warm winter days are a great alternative to blocking the cold drafts that sneak through my 100 year old windows in Denver.  I visited last fall and was happy to attend a luncheon panel on the Colorado River presented by Arizona Forward which my sister’s law firm sponsored.  At that event, the Arizona Community Foundation launched its Water Consciousness Challenge, a project within the New Arizona Prize.  The challenge sought to create meaningful

Water flows near Phoenix, AZ. Tim McCabe / Photo courtesy of USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service., via Wikimedia Commons Water flows near Phoenix, AZ. Tim McCabe / Photo courtesy of USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service., via Wikimedia Commons

opportunities to raise the public’s consciousness about water scarcity, motivate people to become more educated and compelled by this future threat, and ultimately drive the development of new and innovative solutions to Arizona’s water consumption…

View original 291 more words


Happy Earth Day!

April 22, 2015

bootprintearth


Why you and your kids should care about the drought in California

April 22, 2015

Originally posted on Mile High Water Talk:

Herbert Hoover presides over the signing of the Colorado River Compact in November 1922.  (Courtesy U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation) Herbert Hoover presides over the signing of the Colorado River Compact in November 1922.
(Courtesy U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation)

Why you and your kids should care about the drought in California

A father’s attempt to explain why California water restrictions, western growth and dropping reservoir levels in Utah should matter to all of us in Colorado.

By Steve Snyder

When people find out I work at Denver Water, they ask me one question more than any other: “Why do we let water flow out of Colorado to California and other states?”

The short answer is: The Colorado River Compact mandates that California gets its share. But that leads to a longer explanation about the Colorado River Compact, one of many complex laws that govern how water is divided among western states.

Complicated or not, we should all understand how drought in California — and Gov. Jerry…

View original 910 more words


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,179 other followers

%d bloggers like this: