Scaling “The Great Divide” — a movie review

Originally posted on Mile High Water Talk:

Havey Productions’ documentary comes at a critical time for Denver and the West.

By Jimmy Luthye

Great Divide “The Great Divide” premiers on television Monday, Aug. 31, at 7 p.m. on KTVD-TV (Channel 20) in Denver.

It looks like Denver is kind of a big deal now, huh?

Recent lists (here and here and here) have positioned our dusty old mining town as one of the best places to live, work and drink tasty tap water in the country.

Although, this isn’t exactly a recent development.

From our first days in 1858 during the Pikes Peak Gold Rush, to our rapid expansion after World War II, and our quick recovery following the 2008 recession, Denver keeps growing stronger and more appealing to the masses. And it’s only going to continue, with Colorado’s population projected to double by 2050.

But there would be no hip restaurants, no Broncos games on…

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EPA releases internal report on Animas River Spill

Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:

EPA releases first results of internal investigation

FRISCO — EPA officials say that workers at the Gold King Mine likely underestimated the pressure building up inside the mountain. That miscalculation likely resulted in the massive 3 million gallon spill that tainted the Animas and San Juan rivers for miles downstream.

Report:

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The “why” behind our fluoride policy

Originally posted on Mile High Water Talk:

Denver Water’s board decided to continue community water fluoridation by weighing the evidence. Now you can, too.

By Denver Water staff

Denver Board of Water Commissioner members listen to information at the July 2015 fluoride information session. Denver Board of Water Commissioners listen to information at the July 2015 fluoride information session.

In the end, it came down to the science. And there’s a lot of it.

On Aug. 26, the Denver Board of Water Commissioners voted to continue its practice of community water fluoridation.

That decision was not entirely unexpected. Denver Water has been regulating fluoride in the water since 1953, but board members said they took opposition to the policy seriously and requested a review of the latest science from the foremost national and local authorities to inform our policy.

Fluoride naturally occurs in many of Denver Water’s supply sources. We add fluoride as necessary to achieve an average concentration equal to the target recommended by the U.S. Public Health Service and the Colorado…

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Lake Powell April-July inflow was 94 percent of average

Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:

Wet spring and summer help avert worst of water shortages for now

Staff Report

FRISCO — Water storage in Lake Powell peaked on July 14 this year and has started its annual seasonal decline that will continue until spring runoff starts early in 2016, according to an Aug. 18 update from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.

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New documents show EPA tried to warn Colorado about blowout potential at Gold King Mine

Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:

New records show the agency was keenly aware of potential blowout danger at the mine

*Story corrected Aug. 22 at 12:02 a.m. in paragraph 5. Colorado and Utah attorneys general are taking aim at the EPA, not the Colorado and Utah governors.

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO — The EPA knew there was potential for a dangerous blowout at the Gold King Mine at least since the summer of 2014, when the agency issued a Task Order Statement of Work.

In the July 25, 2014, order, the EPA wrote that conditions at the “Gold King Mine present an endangerement to human health and the environment and meet the criteria for initiating a removal action …”

Just more than a year later, the mine spilled about 3 million gallons of water tainted with arsenic, zinc, manganese, cadmium and lead. Concentrations of some pollutants spiked to many times the level deemed toxic for…

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July 2015 was the hottest month on record for Earth

Originally posted on Summit County Citizens Voice:

All signs point toward more record-breaking heat ahead

dfg Only a few small parts of the planet saw anywhere near average or below average temperatures in July 2015.

sdfg There is little question that average global temperatures have been soaring since the 1970s.

Staff Report

FRISCO — July 2015 was the hottest month on record for planet Earth by any measure, federal climate scientists said this week during their monthly global climate update. What’s more, the researchers are 99 percent sure that 2015 will end up as the hottest year since humankind has been tracking the climate, going back to about 1880.

That would break the record set just last year and is sure sign that greenhouse gases are inexorably heating the planet, despite year-to-year variations in the rate of warming.

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Viewpoint: Leveraging EPA’s Orange River to Abate the Threat of Abandoned Mines

Originally posted on Your Water Colorado Blog:

The Animas flows orange through Durango on Aug. 7, 2015, two days after the Gold King Mine spill. (Photo by Esmé Cadiente | www.terraprojectdiaries.com) The Animas flows orange through Durango on Aug. 7, 2015, two days after the Gold King Mine spill. (Photo by Esmé Cadiente | http://www.terraprojectdiaries.com)

By Mark Gibson

If you recall publicity on the Eagle Mine near Beaver Creek or the Yak Tunnel in Leadville, you could predict that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had a manifest destiny to pollute a hundred miles of streams with toxic sludge—from Cement Creek to Lake Powell.

Before John Elway ever won a Super Bowl, the Denver Post spotlighted the Eagle Mine, reporting how regulators’ plans to plug old mine shafts ran afoul—percolating toxic pools overflowed in 1989, causing Beaver Creek’s snowmaking machines to spray “orange snow.” Four years earlier, miners on a maintenance mission during their annual “Yak tunnel walk”–by accident–dislodged muck in workings from the 1800s, releasing a plume in the Arkansas River sufficient to move EPA to create a 20-square-mile…

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