Why is all that water pouring into the street?

Mile High Water Talk

Flushing stagnant water out of our hydrants, all in the name of high-quality H2O.

By Steve Snyder

Steve Lovato gets the same question all the time.

“Why are you wasting water, especially if we’re in a drought?”

As a system quality supervisor for Denver Water, Lovato is charged with flushing more than 3,000 hydrants and blow-off valves in our distribution system. That means he opens hydrants all around the metro area — letting lots of water rush out onto the streets.

Why?

“These hydrants sit at the end of a water main, so water isn’t constantly circulating like in other parts of the system,” said Lovato. “When water sits in a pipe too long, the quality isn’t as high as when it leaves our treatment plants. Flushing the hydrants brings that water quality back to where we want it.”

So every year from April to October, Lovato and…

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Stay hydrated, Denver. We’ll be there to help.

Mile High Water Talk

This summer, our water trailer delivered thousands of gallons of refreshing H2O to more than 20 community events.

Denver Water employees set up a hose with a nozzle to mist hot fans with water at the NFL Kickoff event in Civic Center Park, which was a hit, especially with kids. Denver Water employees set up a hose with a nozzle to mist hot fans with water at the NFL Kickoff event in Civic Center Park, which was a hit, especially with kids.

By Travis Thompson

One of my most cherished childhood memories is standing along the river banks with my grandpa, eagerly waiting to hook “the big one.” Baked by the hot sun bouncing off the water, we spent many of those days sitting in the shade, telling jokes and rehydrating.

My thermos was filled with water, grandpas with milk. Yes, milk.

While he had a hankering for milk, I think most of us would agree with Anchorman Ron Burgundy when he proclaimed, “milk was a bad choice,” on a hot day.

One thing we should all agree on, however…

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Go Time for Colorado’s Water Plan: Meeting the Plan’s Funding Goals

Your Water Colorado Blog

By Nelson Harvey, excerpts pulled from an originally published piece in the Summer 2016 issue of Headwaters magazine

go time bugColoradans put far too much work into Colorado’s Water Plan for it to simply gather dust on the shelf of some government office. Yet the plan, whose final draft was released in late 2015, remains a non-binding advisory document. That means those who helped shape it must take responsibility for acting on it as well. In a fourth part of our ongoing series on the water plan’s implementation, we examine what we as a state must do to achieve the goals for one of the plan’s nine defined measurable outcomes: funding. Colorado’s water plan sets the goal of sustainably funding its own implementation.

Read the first parts of the series on meeting the water plan’s conservation goals, meeting the plan’s environmental and recreational goals, and meeting the plan’s storage goals.

Funding: Paying…

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Preparing Denver for multiple futures, not just one

Mile High Water Talk

Water planners must account for potential changes in climate, population, the economy and other variables.

By Kristi Delynko

Not everyone is Marty McFly, making the job of a Denver Water planner a difficult one. We can’t time travel like Marty, though it would sure make it much easier to be a Denver Water planner.

Have you ever wished you could hop in your silver DeLorean with Marty McFly and Doc Brown and travel through time, like in Back to the Future?

For a Denver Water planner, the ability to zip back and forth across decades would certainly make the job of predicting future water demand much easier. “Try telling a planner he can’t predict the future — it’s a hard reality for us to accept,” said Greg Fisher, manager of demand planning. “But the fact is, no one can predict the future with absolute certainty, so we have to be ready for a variety of scenarios.”

Planning is a continuous process at Denver Water, and while we don’t budget…

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Dam good news on environmental flows

westernriverlaw

Given its track record of dam construction in the 20th Century, the Army Corps of Engineers may seem an unlikely source of good news for rivers.  The Corps ultimately built nearly 700 dams across the nation, including some major ones in the West.  (The chapter in Cadillac Desert describing the Corps’ competition with the Bureau of Reclamation to build dams in the western states is titled “Rivals in Crime.”)  Although flood control is the main purpose of Corps dams generally, they also generate hydropower, support navigation, and provide flatwater recreation, among other things.  There is also growing interest in Corps reservoirs (not only in the West) as potential sources of water supply.

Dams can harm rivers in many ways, so it is not surprising that the Corps has a reputation for riparian destruction.  Starting in the 1980s, however, Congress began giving the Corps authority and direction for environmental restoration efforts; today, the Corps clearly…

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Work continuing on Basalt whitewater park on the Roaring Fork River

basalt-kayak-park-9-19-2016

Granted, it’s not the best photo, given the late afternoon light, but it does show the status of the work as of Monday, Sept. 19, 2016 on the Basalt whitewater park on the Roaring Fork River. Cobble dams are being created to send the flow of the river into a bypass channel so two wave-producing structures can be embedded in the river. The excavator was exiting the river after a day’s work.

– Brent Gardner-Smith, Aspen Journalism

5 things you may not know about Chatfield Reservoir

Mile High Water Talk

This popular recreation spot also happens to be one of Colorado’s hardest-working bodies of water.

By Jessica Mahaffey

Are you a Chatfield junky?

As a long-time Littleton resident, I have fond memories of sailing, water skiing, swimming, fishing and camping at the reservoir with friends on my summer breaks from nearby Columbine High School (Rebel Pride!).

Today, I still enjoy afternoon walks on my favorite trails and take my two small dogs to the onsite dog park.

I’m hardly alone. Chatfield State Park is summer sanctuary in Denver’s back yard, welcoming more than 1.5 million visitors each year, according to Colorado State Parks.

The result: Nearly $10 million in economic impact to the communities within 50 miles of the park.

With all the pleasure it provides, many people may not realize that this is one hard-working reservoir, handling multiple duties and obligations. Here are five facts about Chatfield…

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