Bureau of Reclamation Selects Twenty-one Projects to Receive $2.93 Million to Study Water Treatment Technologies

In membrane distillation water is transferred though a hydrophobic membrane by difference in vapor pressure. The driving force of this process is temperature difference. The difference in vapour pressure allows water in gas form to pass the membrane pores while water molecules are rejected by the hydrophobic membranes. Graphic via BlueTec.
In membrane distillation water is transferred though a hydrophobic membrane by difference in vapor pressure. The driving force of this process is temperature difference. The difference in vapour pressure allows water in gas form to pass the membrane pores while water molecules are rejected by the hydrophobic membranes. Graphic via BlueTec.

From email from Reclamation (Peter Soeth):

Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Estevan López today announced $2.93 million in funding for water treatment technologies research. This funding is being provided through the Desalination and Water Purification Research Program for the development of new water treatment technologies and Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Program for research into the deployment of new technologies that supports the expansion of water technologies in new locations.

“In a number of Western river basins, Reclamation and its partners are seeing demands for water exceed traditional supplies,” Commissioner López said. “Funding research into new water treatment technologies will expand the number of water supply resource options.”

The Desalination and Water Purification Research Program will provide $1.78 million for nine lab-scale and three pilot-scale projects. This program supports the development of new advanced water treatment technologies. Up to $150,000 will be provided for research and laboratory studies that must be completed within a year and up to $200,000 per year for pilot-scale projects that must be completed within two years.

For example, the Colorado School of Mines in Golden, Colorado, will receive $143,869 to study approaches to increase technical feasibility of using membrane distillation for desalinating high-concentration brines, brackish waters, produced waters and seawater. [ed. emphasis mine]

The Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Research Program will provide $1.15 million to help fund nine projects in the Western United States. This program helps communities address water supply challenges by providing much-needed funding for research to establish or expand water reuse markets, improve or expand existing water reuse facilities, and streamline the implementation of clean water technology at new facilities.

For example, the City of San Angelo, Texas, will use $300,000 of federal funding and $1,094,849 of non-federal funding to perform pilot-scale testing to assess existing water treatment technologies for a direct potable reuse project. The proposed research will evaluate approaches to maximize water recovery, verify the performance of advanced water treatment processes, and assess the viability of reverse osmosis concentrate disposal using deep injection wells at an inland location.

A complete list of the Desalination and Water Purification Research Program projects can be found at http://www.usbr.gov/research/programs/desalination. A complete list of Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Research Program projects can be found at http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/title.

The funding provided today supports the White House’s Water Innovation Strategy to address Water Resource Challenges and Opportunities for Water Technology Innovation. The Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Research Program also supports the Department of the Interior’s WaterSMART Program.

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