Saving the frogs of Lake Titicaca — in Denver?

Mile High Water Talk

To study the endangered amphibians, Denver Zoo researchers needed to mimic Peru’s famous lake. Enter Dillon Reservoir.

By Tyler St. John

The team shows the Frisco Police Department, Telma, a underwater robot that could become a resource for the department in the future. The team shows the Summit County Sheriff’s Office, Telma, a underwater robot that could become a resource for the Sheriff’s Office to use at Dillon Reservoir in the future.

As a water utility in the dry West, promoting conservation has become a way of life for our employees. So when we heard that our partners at the Denver Zoo were taking on a new conservation effort, we were ready to pitch in.

The zoo, after all, is already saving on average 214 million gallons of water annually compared to levels used in 1999.

But this time, the zoo is tackling a very different kind of conservation project — to help save the critically endangered frogs of Lake Titicaca, high in the Andes Mountains on the border between Peru and Bolivia.

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