R.I.P Muhammad Ali

Photo via The Bicycle Lobby and Twitter.
Photo via The Bicycle Lobby and Twitter.

“Why should they ask me to put on a uniform and go 10,000 miles from home and drop bombs and bullets on Brown people in Vietnam while so-called Negro people in Louisville are treated like dogs and denied simple human rights? No I’m not going 10,000 miles from home to help murder and burn another poor nation simply to continue the domination of white slave masters of the darker people the world over. This is the day when such evils must come to an end. I have been warned that to take such a stand would cost me millions of dollars. But I have said it once and I will say it again. The real enemy of my people is here. I will not disgrace my religion, my people or myself by becoming a tool to enslave those who are fighting for their own justice, freedom and equality. If I thought the war was going to bring freedom and equality to 22 million of my people they wouldn’t have to draft me, I’d join tomorrow. I have nothing to lose by standing up for my beliefs. So I’ll go to jail, so what? We’ve been in jail for 400 years.” — Muhammad Ali via Wikiquote.

“My conscience won’t let me go shoot my brother, or some darker people, or some poor hungry people in the mud for big powerful America. And shoot them for what? They never called me nigger, they never lynched me, they didn’t put no dogs on me, they didn’t rob me of my nationality, rape and kill my mother and father… Shoot them for what? How can I shoot them poor people? Just take me to jail.” — Muhammad Ali via Wikiquote.

Ali and his deep wisdom inspired me in those formative years in the 1960s when I was a teenager in Denver. He gave up his championship and freedom in opposition to the Vietnam war. I remember the racially charged statements about his purpose for refusing and the hatred many had for him at the time. I didn’t serve in the Vietnam war and I know that Ali’s leadership in opposition to the war caused me to question the purpose of that war and war in general.

I loved his example, train hard, prepare harder, don’t lose sight of the goal, don’t compromise your principles or your humanity. Work to make the world a better place.

Adiós.

The Outsized Life of Muhammad Ali by David Remnick in todays The New Yorker. Here’s an excerpt:

What a loss to suffer, even if for years you knew it was coming. Muhammad Ali, who died Friday, in Phoenix, at the age of seventy-four, was the most fantastical American figure of his era, a self-invented character of such physical wit, political defiance, global fame, and sheer originality that no novelist you might name would dare conceive him. Born Cassius Clay in Jim Crow-era Louisville, Kentucky, he was a skinny, quick-witted kid, the son of a sign painter and a house cleaner, who learned to box at the age of twelve to avenge the indignity of a stolen bicycle, a sixty-dollar red Schwinn that he could not bear to lose. Eventually, Ali became arguably the most famous person on the planet, known as a supreme athlete, an uncanny blend of power, improvisation, and velocity; a master of rhyming prediction and derision; an exemplar and symbol of racial pride; a fighter, a draft resister, an acolyte, a preacher, a separatist, an integrationist, a comedian, an actor, a dancer, a butterfly, a bee, a figure of immense courage.

Here’s an obit from The New York Times (Robert Lypsyte).

Muhammad_Ali_passes_bicycle_in_Volendam

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