Looking for ‘hot spots’ — in all the right places

Mile High Water Talk

New analysis pinpoints water mains at risk, allowing crews to upgrade whole neighborhoods at once. 

By Travis Thompson

Denver Water crew installs a new 12-inch-diameter pipe as part of 2015 pipe replacement program in southeast Denver neighborhood. A Denver Water crew installs a new 12-inch-diameter pipe as part of the 2015 pipe replacement program in a southeast Denver neighborhood.

When a water pipe breaks under the road, there’s no telling what it’s going to do. Some shoot geysers into the air large enough to make Old Faithful jealous. Others turn neighborhood streets into muddy rivers, and some barely send a trickle of water up through the cracks in the pavement.

But even if there isn’t major disruption when the pipe breaks, there will be when it’s time for the repairs. Work crews can’t fix a pipe buried eight feet underneath the street without creating some commotion, from traffic disruptions to noisy equipment and temporary water outages.

Knowing emergency repairs can be a headache — especially when they happen in…

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