Wiggins trustees approve hitching up with the Northeast Colorado Water Cooperative…augmentation credits

February 15, 2014

Augmentation pond photo via Irrigation Doctor, Inc.

Augmentation pond photo via Irrigation Doctor, Inc.


From The Fort Morgan Times (Dan Barker):

The Wiggins Board of Trustees voted to buy a share of the Northeast Colorado Water Cooperative during its monthly meeting Wednesday night. That will cost $2,000.

On any one day, an individual or group with an augmentation plan might have more water credits than the person or group can use or less than it needs, and having the option of sharing credits could help those who are part of the cooperative, said agricultural producer Mike Groves. As it is, if a person or group has excess water credits, the individual or group has to just let it go down the river without use, but the cooperative may change that, he noted.

“It’s something that’s never been done before, but I get sick and tired” of seeing water lost because it cannot be used, Groves said.

Members could transfer water credits to help out those who need them, he said.

Even a little bit of water can make a difference at times, Groves said.

The copperative became official as of Jan. 1, after about seven years of work to put it together, he said. So far, a number of people and groups have become members, said Joe Frank, general manager of the Lower South Platte Water Conservancy District. There are two kinds of members: voting and non-voting, which cost $2,000 or $1,000 respectively for shares. That money becomes capital, and would buy one share of cooperative stock, just like other agricultural cooperatives, Frank said.

More South Platte River Basin coverage here and here.


Wiggins: Raw water system improvements overcome nitrate problems

October 14, 2013
Drilling a water well

Drilling a water well

From The Fort Morgan Times (Dan Barker):

Interim Town Administrator Jon Richardson said he had taken samples of water from all over the town, and the water has much lower levels of nitrates. That means residues of nitrates from years of contaminated well water have washed away in the new water the town brought on line in mid-September, he said.

Also the hardness of the water is down, Richardson said during the Wiggins Board of Trustees meeting Wednesday. The town plans to send out a notice to residents, said Town Clerk Jessica Warden-Leon. Richardson said he wanted to encourage people to stop using water softeners, since they are not needed and the water treatment plant has to deal with them…

He noted that the sprinkler system built for the town park is hooked into the old wells, and so it does not take any of the new water. The same holds for the Wiggins School District’s football field.

More Wiggins coverage here and here.


Wiggins new water system still not online

November 13, 2012

wiggins.jpg

From The Fort Morgan Times (Dan Barker):

During a special meeting of the Wiggins Board of Trustees Wednesday, Public Works Director Jon Richardson said he talked with a representative of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers about whether or not a proposal for putting the town’s pipeline through its flood levee was acceptable. He was told he would hear one way or another this week, but he had not heard yet, he told the board. He planned to call again at the end of the week.

Industrial Facilities Engineering — which is overseeing the water project — said it was still waiting on a company to figure out what it would cost Wiggins to adapt its new water treatment plant to blend water with its existing wells and its new water source, Richardson said. Blending is necessary, because the town does not have enough new water to fill its needs. Richardson said he expects to know how much it would cost next week.

More Wiggins coverage here and here.


Wiggins: New water treatment plant ready to go but the town still needs approvals for supply pipeline

September 29, 2012

watertreatment.jpg

From The Fort Morgan Times (Dan Barker):

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers did send a letter making comments on three proposals to take the pipeline through the town flood levee but wanted clarification on some details like elevations, sections and sketches, said Tim Holbrook of Industrial Facilities Engineering, the firm that is overseeing the Wiggins water project.

Wiggins is replacing its current water supply after the current water levels in town wells has fallen over the years, and because the water is under a health advisory from the Colorado Department of Health and Environment.

During a weekly meeting of the Wiggins Board of Trustees, Holbrook said he will write up what the corps needs over the next few days and send it to Wiggins officials. After that, it will take a while to get a reply, but it is not certain how long.

More Wiggins coverage here and here.


Wiggins: New water treatment plant to undergo testing this week

September 17, 2012

wiggins.jpg

From The Fort Morgan Times (Dan Barker):

The reverse osmosis filters will be installed Tuesday, and plant testing starts Wednesday, [Public Works Director Jon Richardson] said.

Unfortunately, town officials still do not know how they are supposed to complete a final section of water pipeline that would take the pipe through the town flood levee and allow water to start flowing.

Town Clerk Craig Trautwein said he spoke to a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers representative Tuesday, and he was expecting an e mail about which plan the corps would accept — if it accepts any of the proposed plans. The representative would not disclose the results until then, he said.

One piece of good news is that Industrial Facilities Engineering has agreed to eliminate some of the exclusions it had on a plan to blend the town’s existing well water with its new water until Wiggins has enough new water for all its needs.

More Wiggins coverage here and here.


Wiggins secures a Morgan County special use permit for the new water treatment plant

April 20, 2012

watertreatment.jpg

From The Fort Morgan Times (Dan Barker):

The site on which the plant will be built is zoned agricultural, but such a use for the land is permitted with a special use permit, said Jody Meyer of the planning and zoning department as she recommended approval. This treatment plant is one of the parts of the project which will bring a new water supply to the town of Wiggins. Its wells have been running dry and the water quality has become progressively worse, said Tim Holbrook of Industrial Facilities Engineering, the company overseeing the project…

The water treatment facility, which includes a reverse osmosis system, will be built over the new wells situated on Highway 144 near Highway 34. Other components of the project are a 7.3-mile pipeline which will bring the water from the wells to the existing town water tank. Another water tank will sit at the plant and two 19-acre augmentation ponds have been completed near Goodrich.

More Wiggins coverage here and here.


Wiggins: Full speed ahead for new treatment plant, pipeline and augmentation ponds

March 20, 2012

pipeline.jpg

From The Fort Morgan Times (Dan Barker):

The augmentation ponds the project requires are basically done, although a water flow monitoring system needs to be installed and the rest of the land should be seeded to prevent weeds, said Tim Holbrook of Industrial Facilities Engineering, the company directing the project, during Wednesday’s monthly meeting of the Wiggins Board of Trustees. Footings are in place for the water treatment plant building, which will sit over the wells which are already drilled. Work is being done on walls and a water tank, and equipment for the treatment is expected in two to three months, he said…

Another part of the augmentation plan is to buy a structure from the Orphan Wells of Wiggins which will allow the town to send water to the river to offset depletion of groundwater by the new town wells…

Board members also approved an extension on the closing date for buying nine more shares of water rights from Tom and Donna Deganhart and gave Mayor Mike Bates authority to OK another extension if needed. Board members also approved a funding ordinance, which was necessary for buying the shares, said Wiggins Town Attorney Melinda Culley. Buying the shares is contingent on the approval of the Weldon Valley Ditch Co…

The town needs monitoring wells to determine how much the augmentation ponds impact their area’s groundwater levels. At least one neighbor has complained that he feared that the ponds might hurt his crops and buildings if the water level rises too high, Rogers said. It is important to get that done before the ponds begin to fill, said Public Works Director Jon Richardson. Monitoring wells could go in during the next week, Rogers said, and water could begin flowing in the Weldon Valley ditches very soon.

More Wiggins coverage here and here.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,051 other followers

%d bloggers like this: