Cross it off your fish list: First pikeminnow conquers river ladder — The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel

September 16, 2014
Colorado Pike Minnow

Colorado Pike Minnow

From The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel (Gary Harmon):

A Colorado pikeminnow has become the first of its species to make its way up the fish passage in the Colorado River to the Grand Valley Water Users Association roller dam, where it was collected and released to travel upstream, possibly to the top of the pikeminnow’s range near Rifle.

The fish, which turned up Friday in the collection area of the roller dam, is significant for several reasons, said Dale Ryden, project leader for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Colorado River Fishery Project.

“Now we know that this particular species can negotiate this particular fish ladder” at the roller dam, Ryden said. “The efforts we have put in to provide passage for this species in the Colorado River upstream of Grand Junction have not been in vain.”

The fish passage was completed in 2004 and cost about $4.8 million to build.

The fish, which was about 23 inches long and of indeterminate sex, was estimated to be 5 to 8 years old. It was untagged, meaning it is was wild.

No other pikeminnow have negotiated the path to the roller dam and into the fish passage yet, though three other species — razorback sucker, bonytail and humpback chub — already have done so, Ryden said.

The so-called 15-Mile Reach of the Colorado River through the Grand Valley up to De Beque Canyon is already well-known as an important spawning and breeding area for the pikeminnow, the largest of the minnows and the top native predator of the Colorado River through its range.

The pikeminnow’s travels into the waters above the diversion dam, which was completed in 1916, will give biologists a chance to learn more about how the fish might have lived in the upper reaches of the range before the diversion dam and the Price-Stubb dam below cut off their access upstream, Ryden said.

It’s hoped that other pikeminnow will follow the example of this first one and find their way through the diversion dam and into the 40 to 60 miles of potential native range unseen by the species for nearly a century. Before the dams were built, only cooler water near Rifle limited the range of the fish.

“Fish tend to find other fish, it’s the nature of the river,” Ryden said, adding that if the fish found on Friday remains above the roller dam, it might emit pheromones that would attract others of its species to higher reaches of the river.

While this marks the first time a pikeminnow has negotiated the Grand Valley fish passage, pikeminnow long ago mastered the Redlands fish passage on the Gunnison River in Grand Junction.

As many as 17 pikeminnow have passed through that collection facility so far this year, exceeding the previous annual high of 12.

“We’re seeing a slug of young fish that are being collected for the first time,” Ryden said.

The Fish and Wildlife Service also has noted more than 20 razorback suckers passing through the Grand Valley fish passage. The previous high in any year was two.

More endangered/threatened species coverage here.


Residents want wild, scenic designation for Crystal River — Grand Junction Daily Sentinel

September 16, 2014

From The Grand Junction Daily Sentinel (Dennis Webb):

Some local residents think protection of the Crystal River south of Carbondale under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act is the next logical step for sparing it from dams and diversions.

The effort will likely face political challenges, as was evidenced Monday by the reservations expressed about it by Dave Merritt, a board member of the Colorado River Water Conservation District. That district and the West Divide Water Conservancy District previously abandoned most water rights, including ones for large reservoirs, in the face of opposition including a legal challenge by Pitkin County.

Nevertheless, “We see the Crystal River still as an important water supply for western Colorado,” Merritt said during a Garfield County commissioners meeting.

He worries that a wild and scenic designation by Congress would permanently prevent not just further water development of the river but also other activities such as more home construction in the valley.

But Crystal Valley resident Bill Jochems said a dam would be a far more permanent action than wild and scenic designation, which occurs through an act of Congress and Congress could later undo.

“This act has great flexibility,” he said, adding that advocates have a “barebones” goal of preventing dam-building above where irrigation diversions already occur several miles south of Carbondale.

Advocates say the designation wouldn’t affect state or local land-use regulations.

In 2012, the Crystal made American Rivers’ annual America’s Most Endangered Rivers list. That was after the river district and the West Divide district had agreed to concessions that included giving up some conditional rights for two large reservoirs on the river while still envisioning smaller ones in the valley. The rights for the big reservoirs dated to 1958, and one would have required flooding the village of Redstone.

The U.S. Forest Service has found the river eligible for wild and scenic designation, based on the river’s free-flowing status, valley historical attractions such as the Redstone Castle and the former coke ovens in Redstone, the stunning beauty of the valley especially during fall-color season, and other historical, recreational and aesthetic attributes. The Forest Service now is in what Kay Hopkins of the White River National Forest said is the long process of determining whether the river is suitable for such a designation.

“It’s where all the hard questions are asked” about whether designation is best or there are some other ways to protect it, she said.

“It really is an outstanding river and what we’re doing is try to preserve it as it is today for future generations, and that’s what the act is all about,” she said.

More Crystal River coverage here and here.


The latest newsletter from the Water Center at Colorado Mesa University is hot off the presses

September 16, 2014

Climate Change in Colorado report for the CWCB from the Western Water Assessment and CIRES

Climate Change in Colorado report for the CWCB from the Western Water Assessment and CIRES


Click here to read the newsletter. Here’s an excerpt:

CLIMATE CHANGE IN COLORADO
In August, Western Water Assessment released its updated “Climate Change in Colorado” report, a sythensis of climate science relevant for water resources planning. According to the report, even if precipitation doesn’t decline, higher temperatures could still increase stress on water resources. You can find the report here.

WATER SUPPLY UPDATE
A wet monsoon season following a solid winter snow season has left most of the Upper Colorado River Basin with above-average precipitation for the current water year, and prospects for additional moisture over the next 3 months are good.


Work begins on Arkansas Valley Conduit route

September 15, 2014

Preferred route for the Arkansas Valley Conduit via Reclamation

Preferred route for the Arkansas Valley Conduit via Reclamation


From The Pueblo Chieftain (Chris Woodka):

A $939,000 contract for utility location and land rights acquisition support for the Arkansas Valley Conduit has been awarded to MWH Americas by the Bureau of Reclamation. The contract is another step toward the eventual construction of the conduit, which will bring clean drinking water to 50,000 people in 40 communities east of Pueblo.

Work begins this month and is expected to take one year to complete.

The 130-mile-long pipeline will be built from Pueblo Dam to Lamar, with spurs to communities along the way, including St. Charles Mesa, Avondale, Crowley County, Otero County, Bent County, Lamar and Eads in Kiowa County.

“The objective of this contract is to provide Reclamation with utility locations, current ownership information, legal descriptions and encumbrances affecting the parcels along the route,” said Jacklynn Gould, Eastern Colorado Area Manager for Reclamation.

The contractor also will prepare a preliminary land acquisition plan and update GIS data.

The Arkansas Valley Conduit is part of the Fryingpan-Arkansas Project, authorized in 1962. It was never built because of the expense, now estimated at $400 million. A 2009 federal law authorized revenues from Reclamation contracts as a repayment source for the conduit, however.

The Southeastern Colorado Water Conservancy District is the local sponsor of the project.

More Arkansas Valley Conduit coverage here and here.


Experts studying West Salt Creek landslide expect more to occur — Glenwood Springs Post Independent

September 15, 2014

Grand Mesa mudslide before and after via The Denver Post

Grand Mesa mudslide before and after via The Denver Post


From the Glenwood Springs Post Independent (Chad Thatcher):

As first responders to arrive at the slide on May 26, Frank Kochevar, Mesa County Public Works’ professional surveyor, and Tim Hayashi, Mesa County Public Works’ engineer and field commander, remember getting a glimpse of the area, and uttering the words, “Oh, my God.” No one had seen a slide of this magnitude — ever.

After nearly three and half months, Hayashi and Kochevar traveled to the slide dozens of times, setting up surveillance equipment, clearing roads, building trails and juggling 14 different organizations that have a stake in the outcome. From CMU and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) geologists to landowners and Mesa County officials, a rather fragile landscape has created a thoughtful and organized crew of individuals working every day to better understand the event.

Sensitive monitors have recorded every movement around the slide, evacuation routes have been established, maps have been rewritten, gas lines have been shut down, roads reconstructed, cell lines installed and lines of communication set up. All this collaboration is designed to answer the one question on everyone’s mind: Will a landslide of this magnitude happen again? And if so, where, when and how?

After meeting with a host of experts, the definitive answer is yes, there will be another landslide on the Mesa — but as to when, that is all speculation. No one could have predicted the West Salt Creek Slide, its size and destructive force. However, in the aftermath, all eyes turn to similar terrain that flanks the side of the Grand Mesa.

Rex Cole, a geology professor at Colorado Mesa University, explained the unique geography and the complicated history that encompassed the slide area. The region has a long history of landslides; in fact, landslide zones surround the entire Grand Mesa. Gravity has been exerting its force on the mesa for eons, contributing to a form of erosion called mass wasting. The term used by geologists describes the movement of soil and rocks down the side of a mountain. A quick examination of the slide area shows mostly a greenish shale rock from the Green River formation, a kind of fine-grained sedimentary rock that literally crumbles in your hand. It’s not the best foundation, especially on the side of a slope.

During the two days prior to the incident, over an inch of water fell in the area. Jeff Coe, with USGS, said the rain added to the “juiciness” of the slide. Adding an intense rain on snow event to an unstable surface creates the perfect recipe for a landslide.

Geologists are still concerned about the West Salt Creek slide area, especially with the formation of a new 190-acre-feet lake at the headwall. The lake continues to fill and is expected to breach the spillway this spring. At that point the entire headwall has the potential to erode away, sending a wall of water down the slide path. Residents of Collbran are concerned about the influx of water, but Bill Edwards of the U.S. Forest Service concluded that the amount of water is consistent with spring runoff and the watershed should absorb the excess. Still, nearby residents and businesses are preparing for the inevitable, the re-emergence of West Salt creek somewhere along its historic path.

Jerald Hawkins, owner of the property, and Oxy, an oil and gas exploration company, are taking a proactive stance by digging a potential drainage where the creek can safely enter and reconnect with its historical waterway. The slide path narrowly missed the Oxy gas pad located on the Hawkins property. Oxy immediately responded to the incident by shutting down all activity at the site.As first responders to arrive at the slide on May 26, Frank Kochevar, Mesa County Public Works’ professional surveyor, and Tim Hayashi, Mesa County Public Works’ engineer and field commander, remember getting a glimpse of the area, and uttering the words, “Oh, my God.” No one had seen a slide of this magnitude — ever.

After nearly three and half months, Hayashi and Kochevar traveled to the slide dozens of times, setting up surveillance equipment, clearing roads, building trails and juggling 14 different organizations that have a stake in the outcome. From CMU and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) geologists to landowners and Mesa County officials, a rather fragile landscape has created a thoughtful and organized crew of individuals working every day to better understand the event.

Sensitive monitors have recorded every movement around the slide, evacuation routes have been established, maps have been rewritten, gas lines have been shut down, roads reconstructed, cell lines installed and lines of communication set up. All this collaboration is designed to answer the one question on everyone’s mind: Will a landslide of this magnitude happen again? And if so, where, when and how?

After meeting with a host of experts, the definitive answer is yes, there will be another landslide on the Mesa — but as to when, that is all speculation. No one could have predicted the West Salt Creek Slide, its size and destructive force. However, in the aftermath, all eyes turn to similar terrain that flanks the side of the Grand Mesa.

Rex Cole, a geology professor at Colorado Mesa University, explained the unique geography and the complicated history that encompassed the slide area. The region has a long history of landslides; in fact, landslide zones surround the entire Grand Mesa. Gravity has been exerting its force on the mesa for eons, contributing to a form of erosion called mass wasting. The term used by geologists describes the movement of soil and rocks down the side of a mountain. A quick examination of the slide area shows mostly a greenish shale rock from the Green River formation, a kind of fine-grained sedimentary rock that literally crumbles in your hand. It’s not the best foundation, especially on the side of a slope.

During the two days prior to the incident, over an inch of water fell in the area. Jeff Coe, with USGS, said the rain added to the “juiciness” of the slide. Adding an intense rain on snow event to an unstable surface creates the perfect recipe for a landslide.

Geologists are still concerned about the West Salt Creek slide area, especially with the formation of a new 190-acre-feet lake at the headwall. The lake continues to fill and is expected to breach the spillway this spring. At that point the entire headwall has the potential to erode away, sending a wall of water down the slide path. Residents of Collbran are concerned about the influx of water, but Bill Edwards of the U.S. Forest Service concluded that the amount of water is consistent with spring runoff and the watershed should absorb the excess. Still, nearby residents and businesses are preparing for the inevitable, the re-emergence of West Salt creek somewhere along its historic path.

Jerald Hawkins, owner of the property, and Oxy, an oil and gas exploration company, are taking a proactive stance by digging a potential drainage where the creek can safely enter and reconnect with its historical waterway. The slide path narrowly missed the Oxy gas pad located on the Hawkins property. Oxy immediately responded to the incident by shutting down all activity at the site…

In general, unless gravity mysteriously disappears, landslides will continue to shape the landscape; and wherever humans interact with these landscapes, disaster can occur. For example, the state of Washington’s deadly Oso landslide killed 43 people on March 22, taking out an entire rural neighborhood. Despite its isolated location, tragedy also struck at the West Salt Creek slide. While investigating a small landslide that had blocked an irrigation canal, Wes Hawkins, 46, Clancy Nichols, 53, and his son, Danny Nichols, 24, were evidently in the path of the second and more destructive landslide. Their bodies are still missing…

As Grand Mesa residents prepare for winter and the eventual spring runoff, experts are also looking at positive aspects of the West Salt Creek slide. As Bill Edwards of the U.S. Forest Service points out, from an ecological perspective, area experts have an amazing opportunity to observe and monitor the area as life again takes hold. Already flowers and plants are starting to take root in the area.

From The Denver Post (Nancy Lofholm):

Up close, the grayish, topsy-turvy surface of Colorado’s largest recorded rock avalanche yields small surprises that hint at the land as it was before: snail shells, Douglas fir cones, charcoaled wood, nubs of aspen shoots and intermittent clods of rich, brown topsoil.

They’re all tucked into 50 million tons of rock and debris that rumbled and raced down this draw on the Grand Mesa on May 25.

This week, many of the experts who have been studying the slide, along with the county and national officials who have been monitoring it and the landowners impacted by it — one an uncle of a slide victim — walked out on this slide together for the first time.

They shared a thought as they picked their way over the slide’s steep, spongy surface in a whipping wind: They never expect to see anything of this magnitude in this state again in their lifetimes.

“In Colorado, this is historically unprecedented as far as I can tell,” said Jeff Coe, a geologist with the U.S. Geological Survey.

Those watching for the next move of this mass often refer to it as a living entity — a “monster” that churned up pulses of pulverized rock, twisted giant chunks of earth and now hides an underbelly of soaked earth beneath slide matter as deep as 130 feet.

It has proven its danger, even in a sparsely populated area of ranch houses and hayfields, by claiming the lives of Wes Hawkins, Clancy Nichols and Danny Nichols.

The slide’s continuing danger is focused in the 190-acre lake that formed when a massive block of cliffside fell and tilted backward turning into an iffy dam for runoff. The lake is already leaking. That is evident in the smaller seep ponds forming below.

There is no dispute among the experts that the lake will double in size next spring and overflow.

“It is not a question of if, but when,” said Tim Hayashi, an engineer for Mesa County and the field commander for the dozen-plus agencies still studying and monitoring the slide.

When the lake tops, it could form a new creek channel down the middle of the slide. Or it could flow out haphazardly over the the giant hummocks of earth in the middle of the slide path and start a new debris movement. That movement could take debris into an irrigation canal or a creek. It could end up on an Occidental Petroleum Corp. well pad that the initial slide barely skirted.

Occidental is preparing for any slide movement in that direction by abandoning part of the well pad closest to the slide and building berms and a new drainage to divert water or mud.

The need for such measures is underscored by other factors pointed out by the experts this week.

“Those escarpments are a danger, ” said Colorado Geological Survey geologist Jon White as he pointed to a tree-lined ridge that hides large swaths of fractured earth. That could be the next to go.

Coe said the increasing incidence of rain falling on snow — a phenomenon he thinks contributed to this slide — causes snow to melt faster and puts more pressure on unstable rock formations. He expects more of that in more locations with climate change.

For now, monitors on the slide have allowed those living in the vicinity to breath a little easier this summer. But whether the devices will stay put during the winter snows is in doubt.

Hayashi said if the monitors are knocked out, he will climb back up this slide in the early spring even though the danger will be greatly magnified then.

“No one wants to be there,” Hayashi said. “But you just have to do it.”

From The Denver Post (Nancy Lofholm):

Government, industry and scientific experts who recently toured the West Salt Creek rock avalanche area agree that fracking is not to blame for setting off the deadly slide.

The fact that the craggy lower edge of the rock avalanche on the Grand Mesa towers over and curves around a drilling pad where Oxy USA has a gas well is not relevant, they say.

“From my perspective, there is absolutely no evidence fracking was involved in any way,” said U.S. Geological Survey geologist Jeff Coe, who has spent the past 3½ months mapping and studying the slide.

“It was a rain event,” said Jon White, with the Colorado Geological Survey, as he looked out over the mass of pulverized rock that roared down a draw May 25 and buried three local men.

Oxy narrowly escaped the complicated and unusual problem of having a drilling operation buried by tons of debris. But the company, which has wells dotting the Plateau Creek area on the mesa, did not escape claims that drilling activities had caused the slide.

When the first aerial images of the rock avalanche were released, the blaming fingers of online observers immediately pointed at the drilling pad at the toe of the slide. The proximity was taken as proof that fracking — drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure to release natural gas — had made the area unstable and caused 39 million cubic yards of earth to move.

Rex Cole, a Colorado Mesa University geology professor who has studied the formations of the Grand Mesa for four decades, underscored the government geologists’ opinions with charts and maps.

They depict the mesa as a sort of layer cake with 10 million-year-old lava rock capping softer slanted layers of shale, basalt and limestone.

Cole described the Green River layer of rock where the slide occurred as being “squishy” and easy to break off and cave in with heavy rain and seeping groundwater.

“There is a lot of science pointing in the other direction,” he said of claims that fracking caused the earth to move. “You get it wet, and down it comes.”

Fracking in the slide area ended in 2008. It took place in the Williams Fork formation more than a mile below ground and more than 2 miles from where the slide began, near the mesa’s top.

There were no injection wells associated with the drilling in that area. The fracking fluids for Oxy’s wells were stored in tanks.

About 300 to 500 gallons of that fluid was hauled out in trucks in the wake of the slide, said Chris Clark of Oxy USA.

Oxy moved equipment on the well pad and abandoned the end of the pad closest to the slide. Clark said the company is building a berm and drainage to prepare for the possibility that the slide could let go again in the spring.


Glenwood Springs: #COWaterPlan update planned for afternoon session at today’s CWCB board meeting

September 11, 2014

From the Glenwood Springs Post Independent (John Stroud):

River recreation business owners and enthusiasts are expected to be out in force today as the Colorado Water Conservation Board meets in Glenwood Springs at the Hotel Colorado.

The afternoon session will include conversation about the upcoming draft statewide water plan, which is due out later this year at the direction of Gov. John Hickenlooper.

The water plan is the main agenda item from 1-5 p.m. Starting at 3:45 p.m., the board will hear an update on public input received to date from the state’s nine river basins, including from the Colorado River Basin Roundtable. The meeting is open to the public and will include a time for comments.

Meanwhile, boaters, rafters, anglers and other outdoor enthusiasts are gathering in conjunction with the meeting to highlight the economic value of Colorado’s rivers, and to try to ensure river flows are protected from new large trans-mountain water diversions.

The Colorado and other western basin roundtables are urging against including any new Front Range diversion projects in the water plan.

A coalition of business and conservation groups said in a Wednesday press release that they will emphasize the economic importance of Colorado’s river-based economy, which they say is greater than $9 billion annually and supports more than 80,000 jobs in the state…

Geoff Olson, co-owner and operator of Blue Sky Adventures in Glenwood Springs, said in the release that commercial river rafting alone in Colorado last year was worth about $150 million.

“We want the governor and the state water board to make smart, long-term decisions to protect our rivers and our livelihoods, and this huge part of Colorado’s economy,” said Olson, who employs 35 people during the height of the summer whitewater season…

“Colorado’s cities can easily conserve more water, and that will preserve flows for the river-based recreation that is so important to so many Coloradans,” said Annie Henderson, co-founder of the Upper Colorado Private Boaters Association, an American Whitewater affiliate.

Whitewater businesses have also emphasized the need to secure recreational in-stream flows, which is also included in the draft Colorado River Basin Implementation Plan.

The CWCB will continue its meetings Friday, and this morning is scheduled to meet with the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission, also at the Hotel Colorado.

Hayfield message to President Obama 2011 via Protect the Flows

Hayfield message to President Obama 2011 via Protect the Flows

Here’s the release from Protect the flows (Belinda Griswold):

Businesses in Colorado, including boaters, rafters, anglers and other outdoor enthusiasts, will be in Glenwood Springs tomorrow to highlight the economic value of Colorado’s rivers and to ensure river flows are protected from new large trans-mountain water diversions. The river supporters will share their experiences with the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB), which is holding a public board meeting Thursday and Friday at The Hotel Colorado.

At the executive order of Gov. John Hickenlooper, the CWCB is currently preparing the first-ever statewide water plan, which will determine how water is managed across Colorado now and for decades to come. Western Slope businesses – retailers, recreational outfitters and other outdoor-related companies – will emphasize the vast economic importance of Colorado’s river-based economy, which is greater than $9 billion annually and supports more than 80,000 jobs in the state. Water diversions, which are being debated during the CWCB board meeting, would significantly jeopardize this river economy.

“The economic impact of commercial river rafting in Colorado last year was about $150 million, and the Colorado River-based recreation industry as a whole added $9 billion to our state’s economy. For Blue Sky Adventures, we employ 35 people, all of whom depend on healthy rivers,” said Geoff Olson, co-owner and operator of Blue Sky Adventures in Glenwood Springs. “We want the governor and the state water board to make smart, long term decisions to protect our rivers and our livelihoods, and this huge part of Colorado’s economy.”

To protect Colorado’s $9 billion river economy, Colorado’s recreation-based leaders are encouraging the CWCB to ensure smart water management is included in the plan. In lieu of large, new trans-mountain diversions, these business want the CWCB to keep river flows at healthy levels by setting a statewide water conservation goal for the state’s cities and towns, something most other Western states have but Colorado is lacking.

“Colorado’s cities can easily conserve more water, and that will preserve flows for the river-based recreation that is so important to so many Coloradans,” said Annie Henderson, co-founder of the Upper Colorado Private Boaters Association, an American Whitewater affiliate. “If it’s going to be a Colorado water plan, it has to reflect Colorado values.”

Another way the CWCB can ensure ample water and support Colorado’s $9 billion river economy supply is by integrating the best recommendations for recreational flow, such as that proposed by the Colorado River Basin Implementation Plan, which called for a goal to protect water for recreational boating purposes.

“Our state’s recreation economy depends on healthy stream flows today,” said Nathan Fey, director of Colorado River Stewardship Program for American Whitewater. “These flows support existing businesses, jobs and local economies that rely on active outdoor recreation and tourism. Trans-mountain diversions are being proposed as a way to meet a future need – an unknown and speculative demand. The conversation about water supply at the state and local levels must be about the trade-offs between our needs today, and what our needs might be in the future.”

Adding to the direct economic boost rivers provide, Coloradans cherish their natural landscape including the rivers that provide opportunities for boating, rafting and fishing. Surveys of Colorado voters show that outdoor recreation is among the top values for residents. In addition, Front Range businesses report that outdoor recreation opportunities are key for attracting and retaining talented employees.

The supporters of healthy rivers plan to hold a press conference at Blue Sky Adventures’ offices (319 6th St, Glenwood Springs, CO 81601, at the Hotel Colorado) starting at approximately 12:00 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 11. In addition, several supporters are scheduled to speak later in the day at the CWCB board meeting including:

Speakers at the event will include representatives from outdoor recreation businesses, Protect the Flows, American Whitewater, and many more.

To learn more about Colorado’s statewide water plan, please visit http://wwww.waterforcolorado.org.

doloresriveraspens

From the Northwest Council of Governments:

Leaves are starting to change and work on the Water Plan is gearing up around the State. The Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) will be visiting the Colorado Basin this week, holding their board meeting in Glenwood Springs on Sept. 11-12. Part of their discussion will be a review of many draft sections of the Water Plan, released to the public by way of their board meeting agenda. We are anxious to jump into a review of those draft sections—we are encouraged and impressed with the amount of data the CWCB staff have already sifted through to complete these draft sections! We will keep you posted as well learn more.

Meanwhile, QQ has been reviewing the Basin Implementation Plans submitting from Basins around the State over the past month. As one might expect, many Basins agree with some foundational QQ Principles for the Water Plan, while others conflict with some of our primary points. We’ll keep working on a summary document that can help guide those who don’t have time to read the 1000s of pages of information!

Over the next several months, the CWCB will wrap up the first complete draft of Colorado’s Water Plan! This fall marks a crucial time for public input on the draft sections released already, as once this draft is completed the Plan will move to revisions in the Governor’s office and away from the hands of the CWCB. As always, you can provide comment at http://www.coloradowaterplan.org.

More CWCB coverage here.


NIDIS: Weekly Climate, Water and Drought Assessment of the Upper #ColoradoRiver Basin

September 10, 2014
Upper Colorado River Basin 7-day precipitation August 1 -7, 2014

Upper Colorado River Basin 7-day precipitation August 1 -7, 2014

Click here to read the current assessment. Click here to go to the NIDIS website hosted by the Colorado Climate Center.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,014 other followers

%d bloggers like this: